Crouching Tiger & Beyond

Live-To-Picture Concert Event

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“A mix of Hollywood grandeur and primal, percussive vitality.”
The New York Times

Multimedia and Orchestra with the Integration of Chinese Martial Arts Philosophy

World renowned composer/conductor Tan Dun has had the honor of composing the music for three martial Arts films by world critically acclaimed directors: Ang Lee (Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon), Zhang Yumou (Hero), and Feng Xiaogang (The Banquet). Combining the ancient tradition of Chinese martial arts philosophy and visual arts, the films were all received with high praise worldwide.

Each of these concertos, based on three great martial arts films, focus on themes of sacrifice, desire, and love through martial arts. Desire for transcendence, revenge, and power. Characters in each story must struggle with the question, “For what did you sacrifice your life, and why much your love be reborn?”

The cello in Crouching Tiger Concerto plays the voice of Lio who dreamt of spiritual transcendence through martial arts. Her dramatic journey of power, sacrifice and determination is heard through the concerto until her final Farewell brings her back to water and stone.

The violin of Here Concerto tell the ancient story of Lin who sacrificed love to defend her country. She seeks, above all else, revenge and redemption for the people.

In The Banquet Concerto the voice of Ano is represented by the piano. And, not a martial artist, or an assassin, but an Empress, sacrifices love in pursuit of power. The piano is heard along with the voices of her people in the chorus on her journey.

“…with an ecstatic audience enjoying a clever concoction of visual and musical highlights from the three martial arts films to which Tan had provided soundtracks…the score culminated in a fulsome climax, in which we could watch Tan himself, up on the screen, blissed out by sumptuous sequences.”
The New Zealand Herald
“An epic, multimedia production, full of big-screen emotions and unabashed melodrama.”
Washington Post